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The Happy Man - A Romp thru the Mind of GK Chesterton


G. K. Chesterton was one of the dominating figures of the London literary scene in the early twentieth century. Not only did he get into lively discussions with anyone who would debate him, including his friend, frequent verbal sparring partner, and noted Irish playwright George Bernard Shaw, but he wrote about seemingly every topic, in every genre, from journalism to plays, poetry to crime novels. "He said something about everything and he said it better than anyone else," declared Dale Ahlquist, president of the American Chester Society, on the society's Web site. Most of Chesterton's literary output was nonfiction, including thousands of columns for various periodicals.

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Personally, we find GK to be the most interesting man in the world... and he doesn't even drink Dos Equis! We love his heart-felt veneration of the common man.

Chesterton’s appreciation of the common man predates his college years. His teenage notebooks are full of a reverence for ordinary people, expressed as a corollary to his reverence for the most ordinary of objects and things. Chesterton’s respect for the common man was basically a respect for free will. He said that the actions of a beggar are as momentous as the actions of a prime minister, because the beggar’s actions are no less free and have an eternal significance surpassing all merely temporal enterprises, even those of prime ministers and kings.

This is a view that contradicts the conventional way of looking at things. The decisions and choices of beggars do not seem very momentous to us. We are conditioned to believe that the lives of presidents and dictators, business tycoons and financiers, newscasters and even entertainers, are more important, more influential, more significant than the lives of nameless hobos and panhandlers. Not so Chesterton, in spite of the appearances. As Father Brown expressed it,

I mean that we here are on the wrong side of the tapestry. The things that happen here do not seem to mean anything; they mean something somewhere else.

This man was witty, funny, profound but most all innocently child-like. His intellect combined with this innocense makes him a most charming character. This play romps through his thoughts, his opinions, his jokes, his philosophy and his faith. You must see this play. You will be fascinated and inspired to find out more about this admirable champion of the common man. 

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Click Here: Tickets for our two Evening Shows

Earlier Event: September 17
the church beyond the walls
Later Event: November 10
Theatrical Production: Beyond Glory